Hi.

Welcome to my blog. I document my adventures in travel, style, and other bloggers. Hope you have a nice stay!

Bed Peace: The Battle of Yohn & Joko ★★★✰✰

Bed Peace: The Battle of Yohn & Joko ★★★✰✰

1969. Woodstock, England world cup, summer of love … and the moment John Lennon and Yoko Ono took over a hotel room in Monteral, Canada, campaigned for peace and sparked a movement of love which the hit song; ‘Give peace a chance.’

Bed Peace: The battle of Yohn and Joko focuses on that story. We see a journey of John and Yoko from the miscarriage of their baby boy, to the marriage, to the travels all the way through to them entering the hotel room.

Jung Sun Den Hollander portrays raw emotion as Yoko Ono going through a range of emotions yet dedication to her husband John, (Craig Edgley). Edgley and Hollander work well together as the famous couple, the arguments and the love they have between each other is shown and there’s no doubt leaving your mind as to who they are.

Hollander and Edgley - Yoko & John

Hollander and Edgley - Yoko & John

Helen Foster as the narrator does a good job bringing energy into the show and keeping up the pace and they flitter between scenes and year showing the uprising of the hippies and the peace moment.

Helen Foster

Helen Foster

Devised and directed by Rocky Rodriguez Jr, he uses out recordings in the show. The baby’s heart beat which was the original recording of the couples baby as well as the Berkley student phone call which was a recording taken from the original audio record between Lennon, Ono and the Berkley students in 1969.

During one scene in the hotel room, we meet a couple of civilians of Canada, Lyna (Lyna Dubarry), Amelia (Amelia Parillon), Thomas (Thomas Ababio) and Josh (Joshua Mcgregor). The supporting actors added a much needed difference to the show, however, there was one monologue from Parillon that left we with raised eyebrows. The scene got very much into race which for the time and for authenticity is fine, but one of the quote from Parillon left me feeling a bit shocked; ‘No white man is ever going to be the hero.’ I’m not going to say I was offended because I hate that word and I wasn’t offended, I just felt it was incredibly rude. There were no conversation insulting people of colour, yes, ignorant comments, but I felt that the lines Parillon were delivering were a bit strong.

Thomas Ababio & Amelia Parillon

Thomas Ababio & Amelia Parillon

There is a message in this show; ‘Push peace that’s funny not serious’ and open your eyes to others, have awareness of other people and their struggles. The message was strong and clear.

As a whole, this show does outline some pretty serious issues that happened back in the 60’s, but it also shows what people can achieve when they stop the hate and open their eyes.

Bed Peace is currently on at the Cockpit Theatre until the 28th April 2018.

Queereteria TV ★✰✰✰✰

Queereteria TV ★✰✰✰✰

Romance Romance ★★★★✰

Romance Romance ★★★★✰